Category Archives: The Sound of Music

Eszen: Still Here//Still There

The second artist released on the Irregular Patterns label is a near 10 minute psychedelic mind bending number by their resident noise merchant Eszen. Strap yourself in and take the trip.

13aX: Unquietly

The second instalment of the 13aX journey on Irregular Patterns. This track is called Unquietly. Loaded with chill out vibes and the continual search for a lost soul.

Tago Mago

February 2021 and it will be 50 years since the release of properly one of the greatest rock albums EVER. Tago Mago, by Can was recorded during November 1970, built around experimental sessions blending Jazz, Funk, tape editing and sampling, avant-grade. Released during February 1971 it was the band’s first album to feature Damo Suzuki after the 1970 departure of vocalist Malcolm Mooney. 

No.5: Bullitt

One of the cool things about being a year older than most of the kids on the street I was brought up in 1968, was the difference between wanting a replica Chitty Chitty Bang Bang or the iconic Mustang drove by Steve McQueen in Bullitt. Both films were released in 1968, I was 8, and very much appreciated that I got both. One for my birthday and one for Christmas, only the Chitty Chitty Bang Bang survives to this day in a well- battered form, but what of that Mustang!

By the 1970s a whole sway of films featured iconic cars. In 1972s blaxploitation film Super Fly we had the Cadillac Eldorado, grotesquely named ‘the pimp machine’. James Bond drove and spun over a river in his AMC Hornet, 1974’s The Man with the Golden Gun. in 1977 Burt Reynalds had kicked off his Smokey and the Bandit franchise, which often featured the Pontiac Trans Am. But nothing compared to McQueen’s Mustang, not even (sacrilege) James Bonds, Aston Martin DBS. which made an appearance in Sean Connery’s last great Bond film Diamonds are Forever.

McQueen always, to me, cut the cool maverick anti-hero in his Ford Mustang GT Fastback and before videos, DVD’s, satellite and cable this impatient youngster would endure the whole film just to watch the mesmerising car chase through San Francisco.

Plenty of people have lusted over that Highland Green Mustang, which has over-time achieved legendary status. Although it was not until much later that I fully appreciated Lao Schifrin’s original score that tracks the various moods and action of the film to perfection. It took until 2009 for the never-before-released original recording of the score, as heard on the movie, to be made available.

My tribute to McQueen’s Ford Mustang GT Fastback is the Shelby (Cobra) GT-350, built between 1965 and 1970 by the American the high-performance vehicle manufacturer founded by former racing driver Carroll Shelby. The most famed car in American cinema, sold for $3.4 million at auction in Florida during 2020.

 

 

The Sound of Japan

Pretending to feel the warmth of sun rays on my neck, I walked from the garden to the kitchen my thoughts were distracted by the telephone. Having lifted the receiver I immediately knew Mysterious Vee voice was awaiting my ears. Her journey this time was the eclectic rhythms of the Japanese soundscape.

Synthesiser for the Devil

Mysterious Vee calls from a telephone booth in rural Punjab, Indian, and brings another collection of artists and tracks, some well known and some not so. Her theme in this episode of Lost In a Wide Open Field is an exploration of artists, some known and some not so, who have utilised the honourable synth.