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Posts tagged ‘London’

Clash with a Titan

I must confess that upon relocating to London from Bristol in the late 90s, like a child playing with an oversized train set, I loved using the London Underground system. I never entirely understood the wails and grunts from work colleagues as they arrived at the office first thing each morning.

Accepted, it was not the best place to be on a hot day between Brixton and Vauxhall. Especially in an over-crowded carriage, waiting for the light to change and drivers unintelligible announcements.

Donning my headphones and observing the subterranean world become one of my little daily pleasures. Witnessing the solemn faces of passengers navigate the unwritten constitution, which governs the use of the underground with an iron glove:

Do not acknowledge other people
Pretend to read something essential.
Do not disturb.
Do not invade space and avoid all physical contact.
Do not intervene in other peoples misdemeanours.
Learn to pivot and balance against gravity.
When the occasion arises, gawk at your reflection.
Rush hour: Be a complete and inconsiderate tosser.

The practice of social distancing, before it became a necessity. After a period of using the same route a small acknowledgement, a nod of the head would be exchanged between familiar faces.

One particular day, it was my first week of employment at Lambeth Council. I was still coming to terms with the kaleidoscope of new names and faces, and I jumped on the system at Brixton Underground.

The carriage was pretty full, but not overcrowded. As the carriage pulled away, I noticed one of my new work colleagues down the other end of the carriage. I looked him in the eyes and gave him a firm nod of acknowledgement. He looked down and did not respond.

A few moments later, he lifted his head and looked my way. I gave him a smile and reaffirmed my acknowledgement. Once again, he looked away only this time a little more uncomfortably as if he was being tested by a psychopath. He tried to move behind somebody close to him, but I could see him looking at me through the reflection of the carriage window. I gave his reflected stare an acknowledgement, and he shuffled behind this human shield again.

Now feeling somewhat offended, I thought, fuck it, you miserable sod. The carriage pulled into Stockwell Station. I watched my supposed work colleague take a quick glance, again through the reflection in the window. I looked away in disgust. The driver announced the closing of the doors, next stop Vauxhall. In the blink of an eye, my work colleague jumped from the train onto the platform, leaving me with no time to join him.

With great stature, he stared directly at me, as the carriage slowly started to move. His eyes shouted out to me, “who the fuck are you?”

At this point, I realised my work colleague was none other than Mick Jones, guitarist from The Clash. Our paths were never to cross again.

The V&A Museum London: 1st Floor Main Entrance

London 22nd March 2018

Confront hate with love. Let the people of hate know we are all better than this and we are not afraid. Thank you to the police, emergency services and ordinary people who sought to help the casualties. 

Searching for Babylon

Babylon

The empty screeching late night tube train collides through its tunnels with ear piercing velocity.  The empty seats until the lonely musician gets on board for his journey. Another thankless gig no doubt, playing to a half caring audiences unaware of the struggles and the rip-off venues. He looks despondent, but no doubt tomorrow he will continue his search for his personal Babylon.

Pause for thought (Unknown): San Marino’s Cafe Brixton

The hustle of the cafe and smells of coffee and food being prepared, the noise of street life penetrates through the open windows. searching for seats and amongst this background, people find time to contemplate and pause for thought.
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West Norwood Cemetery, London

West Norwood Cemetery embraces dignified silence, being reflective, there is a deeply respectful and humbling sensation from visiting this cemetery. An appreciation of ones own allotted space in this metropolis we call a world that carries on regardless of individual circumstances. The realisation that time is the most precious resource we have freely inherited from our parents. Cemeteries are indeed emotive spaces and nowhere is this more evident than West Norwood Cemetery.

One of the magnificent seven cemeteries of London and recognised as a site of major historical, architectural and ecological interest. West Norwood Cemetery has the reputation of holding one of the finest collections of sepulchral monuments in London, featuring 69 Grade II and Grade II listed buildings and structures, including a dedicated Greek Orthodox necropolis with 19 listed mausoleums and monuments. Its extensive Gothic Revival architecture qualifies it as one of the significant cemeteries in Europe. The cemetery has a very active Friends of Group that aim to increase knowledge and appreciation of the Cemetery. The group hold general tours on the first Sunday of every month, special themed tours of the cemetery during the summer, and meetings with talks during the winter.

Thames

Camden Lock – London

I always find Camden to be one of those places that draws people for many reasons. The tourists, trendies, drunks and druggies all seem to collide together. As night falls the area becomes a little more tense and people start to be a little more aware of one another.

Kentish Town, London @ Night

I have a teeengae daughter who likes rock music, which inevitably means I escort here to rock concerts. This means I need to occupy myself for a few hours whilst my daughter and her friend enjoy the mayhem. On this occasion it was a band called Five Finger Death Punch at the Forum, London. I went for a walk to Kentish Town.

Kentish Town

Kentish Town @ Night

Whilst London Sleeps – Clapham, London

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